Stub mortisea shallow mortise, the depth of which depends on the size of the timber; also a mortise that does not go through the workpiece (as opposed to a “through mortise”). Stub tenonshort, the depth of which depends on the size of the timber; also a tenon that is shorter than the width of the mortised piece so the tenon does not show (as opposed to a “through tenon”). Loose tenona tenon that is a separate part of the joint, as opposed to a fixed tenon that is an integral part of one of the pieces to be joined.

Tenon mortise joint

mortise and tenon

Woodworkers around the world have used it for thousands of years to join pieces of wood, mainly when the adjoining pieces connect at an angle of 90°. The tenon is cut to fit the mortise hole exactly and usually has shoulders that seat when the joint fully enters the mortise hole.

Wedged half-dovetaila mortise in which the back is wider, or taller, than the front, or opening. Through tenona tenon that passes entirely through the piece of wood it is inserted into, being clearly visible on the back side.

Hammer-headed tenona method of forming a tenon joint when the shoulders cannot be tightened with a clamp.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dovetail_joint